Category: linkfest

Science online, bird’s-eye view of peer review edition

Science online, bird’s-eye view of peer review edition

Miami Beach

Stormy weather ahead. Photo by Elido Turco – Gigi.


Source: Wayback Feed

Science online, dilated pupils edition

Science online, dilated pupils edition

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pupils 2007 An apt pupil. Photo by thraxil.
  • So. Freaking. Cool. NASA successfully landed a car-sized, nuclear-powered, laser-equipped exploratory rover on Mars—for a fifth of the cost of the 2012 Olympic Games.
  • Meanwhile, in the life sciences. Thousands of ecologists converge on Portland, Oregon for the Ecological Society of America meeting. Check Dynamic Ecology and EEB & Flow for coverage.
  • What is the difference between wheelchair racing and cycling, when you think about it? The line between human athletic achievement and technological advancement is fuzzier than you might think.
  • Next: NOM announces that pupil dilation is a “lifestyle choice.” A new approach to testing sexual orientation measures pupil dilation. See also good discussion by Scicurious and Deborah Blum.
  • Yet another microbiome. Examining the bacteria living on the surface of plant roots might be as informative as examining the ones living inside plant roots.
  • Commitment to innovation? Apparently the fundamentalist textbooks for Christian schools are now opposed to set theory.
  • FACT: Wearing a bike helmet all day = 80% reduced risk of death by meteor. How to clearly explain risk, with an illustrative story.
  • Because we only think they think they’re people. Why it’s important to avoid anthropomorphizing when discussing the sexual habits of non-human animals.
  • Cool! Google Scholar will now identify new articles for you to read based on your own publication list.
  • That … sounds like a problem. Some of the world’s most important food-producing regions are living on non-renewable water.


Source: New feed

Science online, solve for x edition

Science online, solve for x edition

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Ocean Latte Save your Starbucks card, and have a cup of ocean instead. Photo by nicadlr.


Source: New feed

Science online, disruptive lesbian astronauts edition

Science online, disruptive lesbian astronauts edition

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Sally Ride. Photo by WikiMedia Commons.
  • She defied gravity. Sally Ride, the first female U.S. astronaut—and only queer astronaut?—died this week. See also, also, and also.
  • Quiet, honey! Hungry bats zero in on the sound of flies mating.
  • I think yes. Do evidence-based teaching methods need to start addressing motivated reasoning?
  • Is anyone surprised? The geometry of herd responses to a predator suggests sheep are selfish.
  • Sure, why the hell not? Is open-access on the verge of “disrupting” academic publishing?
  • War on facts, round infinity. Government-funded research did, in fact, create the Internet.
  • Isn’t this like making Solo cups out of steel? Shark teeth are covered in fluoride, which may mean they never get cavities.
  • It’d be … kinda gross. If Spiderman’s anatomy more properly paralleled a real spider’s.
  • You’re doing it wrong. Pronouncing “Muller’s Ratchet”, that is.
  • Gooey suicide bombers. In one species of termites, aging workers end their careers as suicide bombers.


Source: New feed